Update: 2 months of Aerobic Training

[I’ve gone and done it again.  I wrote 90% of this post then never got around to finishing and posting it, so it’s a little out of date but still relevant.  So here it is…]

 

So, I’ve almost managed 2 months of running slowly aerobically.  I’ve done a race.  And I’ve got some good stats to show whether it’s all working or not so far for me.

Review of the Runs

This post covers the time from mid November when I started through to 6th January, over which time I ran 310 miles.  I’ve downloaded some data, doodled some graphs and even made up a new metric which I think may go some way towards quantifying aerobic fitness.

Heart Rate

First, here’s the average heart rate chart for my runs:

Two Running Feet - Average Heart Rate

Average Heart Rate

 

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First week (ish) of Maffetone (ish) Running

(I started writing this post in mid November, but never quite finished it.  I’ll write another post shortly on my experience to date (January 2015) shortly, but for now, here’s the original post…)

Last Tuesday, I started running with an approximation of the Maffetone method.  I wanted to write a short post about what I’m doing, why, and my thoughts from the first week or so.

Why

Over the past year, for several reasons I’ve come to the realisation that walking is a really good exercise – both on it’s own and as a benefit for endurance running.  It’s a solely aerobic activity, and it’s something you’re likely to do at least a bit of during an ultra so it’s worth getting good at it.  Think about it like this – suppose you’re doing a 100 miler and you walk 30 miles of it.  If you work on your running and increase your running pace by 1 minute per mile (a good improvement and lot of work for a reasonably well trained runner) you’ll save yourself 70 minutes for the run.  But if you reduce your walking pace from 20 minutes per mile to 15 minutes per mile, you’ll save 150 minutes – over twice as much.  And it’s really not that difficult to do. Continue reading →